Cooking with Enameled Cast Iron

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Cooking with Enameled Cast Iron

Why You’ll Love It

  • It Will Never Rust 

    Because of the enameled coating inside and out, the possibility of rust is totally removed. This is great because not only do you not have to season enameled cast iron, it opens up an avenue of cleaning not typically recommended for regular cast iron—soaking. If burnt food or stains are being stubborn, it’s perfectly fine to give your pan a nice, lengthy soak to help remove them. I’ve been asked many times if the black rim around the top of an enameled cast-iron Dutch oven is bare iron. Typically, it is black, matte-finish enamel and will not rust.

  • It’s Non-Reactive

    Enameled cast iron will not react with acidic foods, such as those made with tomatoes, wine, vinegar, or citrus. I reach for enameled  whenever I make things like spaghetti sauce, chili dishes, and sauces. When I was growing up, my father used to cook acidic foods all the time in his cast regular cast iron, but it was well seasoned, as in years, not weeks or months. Enameled cast iron removes this waiting period and allows you to cook just about whatever you want, right now.

  • It’s Braise-Friendly

    A friend from a cast-iron group once told me that he was having a difficult time keeping his regular cast-iron Dutch ovens seasoned. He proceeded to tell me that he slow cooks a lot of soups, stews, and braises. Doing this repeatedly in regular cast iron will harm your seasoning over time. It doesn’t necessarily give foods a bad taste, but slow cooking these types of foods can be very hard on your seasoning. Enamel coating solves this problem.

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